Collections

The Oesterreicher-McCormick Cabin

oesterreicher-mccormick-cabin-beaches-museumBuilt in 1873 on Twenty Mile in Palm Valley, the Oesterreicher-McCormick Cabin is one of the area’s oldest examples of Florida Cracker architecture.  Under threat of destruction to make way for a development, the Cabin was identified by the Beaches Museum not only for its historic significance, but for its potential as a support building within the History Park.

The cabin was donated to the Museum and a very successful capital campaign to provide for restoration ensued.  Great care was taken to preserve as much of the craftsmanship and original features of the Cabin as possible while bring it up to modern-day building codes and requirements.

Opened to visitors in November, 2016, the Cabin has proved to be not only an ADA compliant bathroom and gathering area, but also a fascinating glimpse in to pioneer life in Florida for visitors, school groups and the community.

The Ocean View Hotel

The Ocean View Hotel was located at Pablo Beach (now Jacksonville Beach) along the ocean front at the foot of Putnam Boulevard and Pablo Avenue. Like most grand structures of their time, it burned to the ground in 1926.

Also Read

Historic Hotels at the Beaches

The Oceanic Hotel

The Oceanic Hotel was located at Pablo Beach (now Jacksonville Beach) along the ocean front. Unlike most grand structures of their time, it did not burn down.

The Oceanic Hotel was torn down in 19__, some items were salvaged. In the Foreman’s House bathroom, a large tall mirror is from the hotel.

Also Read

Historic Hotels at the Beaches

 

The Murray Hall Hotel

John G. Christopher built the Murray Hall Hotel in 1886 at the oceanfront in Pablo Beach where the Lifeguard Station stands today. He had high hopes of starting a tourist industry to rival that underway in Jacksonville. The hotel was a fabulous three story structure with a tower-like section of six stories in the front. It had a billiard room, bowling alley, bar, reading room, sulphur water spa, a large reception hall, over 50 fireplaces, steam heat, an elevator, and its own plant to supply the hotel’s electricity. Water came from an artesian well, which provided all of Pablo Beach with water until the 1920s.

Antique furnishings, crystal chandeliers, imported lace curtains and heavy drapes were used throughout the hotel. The hotel advertised that it had a capacity for 350 guests. Guests could travel on the newly developed railway, the Jacksonville and Atlantic Railroad (1885) from South Jacksonville to the oceanfront. Unfortunately the hotel burned after only four years.

The Murray Hall Hotel

Also Read

Historic Hotels at the Beaches

 

McCormick Hotel and Apartments

McCormick Hotel & Apartments “New Modern, 100% Fireproof, Rooms, suites and Completely furnished Housekeeping Apartments, Open all year.”
Three story, flat-roofed building: 1601 North third St., Jacksonville, Beach, Florida

McCormick Motel Jacksonville Beach 2McCormick Apartment Hotel; 1601 N. 3rd St., A1A Hiway – Jacksonville Beach, Florida
A modern Motor Hotel with all the conveniences of home. Each Apartment has a Kitchen completely equipped. Tile Bath and Shower, 200 yards from World’s finest Beach, Air Conditioned, well heated in winter. TV Equipped. Open year round. Special Winter rates by week, month or season. (Old: phone: Cherry 9-9063)

McCormick Apts “New, modern, completely furnished. 354 apartments, 110 rooms by day, week, month, year. Open all year”
Three story, flat-roofed building.

Also Read

Historic Hotels at the Beaches

 

The Atlantic Beach Hotel

The first Atlantic Beach HotelThe Atlantic Beach Hotel was the new name given to the Continential Hotel in 1913. Unfortunately it burned to the ground in a spectacular fire in 1919 on September 20th. A new hotel, also named the Atlantic Beach Hotel, soon replaced the wooden structure and remained in operation until the late 1960s. That hotel was quite a bit smaller as can be seen in the second photo below.

After the fire of the Atlantic Beach Hotel in 1919, a few items were salvaged, including adjacent area buildings that did not burn. A sink shaving/vanity mirror salvaged from the servants quarters has been preserved in our Foreman’s House building located here in Pablo History Park.

Also Read

Historic Hotels at the Beaches

 

The Continental Hotel

In 1900, after purchasing the Jacksonville and Atlantic Railway, which ran from South Jacksonville to Pablo Beach, and making it part of his Florida East Coast Railway system, Henry Flagler built the Continental Hotel on the railroad line between Pablo Beach and Mayport. A summer resort, the Continental was a massive colonial yellow building with signature green blinds. The Continental had 250 guest rooms, 56 baths, large parlors, and a huge dining room. Although the exterior was architecturally simple, the interior was considered luxurious. For guests’ enjoyment, there was a 9-hole golf course, a dance pavilion, a fishing pier, tennis courts, and a riding stable. There was a train depot on the west side of the hotel.

The Continental changed names in 1913 to the Atlantic Beach Hotel. Unfortunately it burned to the ground in a spectacular fire in 1919 on September 20th. A new hotel, also named the Atlantic Beach Hotel, soon replaced the wooden structure and remained in operation until the late 1960s. The later hotel was much smaller than the original. Nothing since has ever compared to the grandeur of the Continential Hotel.

Also Read

Historic Hotels at the Beaches

 

1903 Pablo Beach Post Office

This 1903 post office was the first stand-alone post office in Pablo Beach. It was originally located two blocks east and one block north. Mrs. Celenia Dickerson was the postmaster in this building. The building was used from 1903-1909, and by 1917 it had been moved to Second Street South and became part of a home. In 1986 Eagle Scout Scott Chandler and his crew helped prepare the building for its move to Pablo Historical Park.

The 1911 Train Engine

The 1911 Train EngineThe 25 ton steam locomotive was built by H. K. Porter and Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in March 1911 as Serial Number 4845. It was manufactured for the W.W. Cummer & Sons Lumber Company of Dade City, Florida and operated near Lacoochee, Florida. It was used to haul pine and cypress logs in Pasco County, near Miami. The tools on the back of the tendercar are track and logging tools.

It has a 2-6-0 wheel configuration indicating two wheels in the front, six under the boiler, and none under the cab. This locomotive is typical of a steam locomotive of the early 1900s.

It was donated to the Beaches Museum in 1981 by the City of St. Augustine where it had been on display for 21 years. It was moved here from St. Augustine in 1982, and is now displayed near the original location of the Jacksonville and Atlantic Railroad tracks, which became the Florida East Coast Railway.

Notice the original smokestack, also the pilot is not mounted in this photo

Notice the original smokestack; also the pilot is not mounted in this photo.

A passenger train would have had a similar locomotive and tender. The baggage cart in the back of the station is filled with luggage from the era of the train.

Beaches Museum & History Park
381 Beach Boulevard
Jacksonville Beach, Florida 32250